The Routledge Companion to Rehabilitative Work in Criminal Justice

Author:   Pamela Ugwudike (Department of Sociology, Social Policy and Criminology, University of Southampton, UK) ,  Hannah Graham (Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Stirling, UK) ,  Fergus McNeill (School of Social & Political Sciences, University of Glasgow, UK) ,  Peter Raynor (College of Law and Criminology, Swansea University, UK)
Publisher:   Taylor & Francis Ltd
ISBN:  

9781138102057


Pages:   1188
Publication Date:   19 September 2019
Format:   Hardback
Availability:   In Print   Availability explained
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The Routledge Companion to Rehabilitative Work in Criminal Justice


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Overview

All the world's criminal justice systems need to undertake direct work with people who have come into their care or are under their supervision as a result of criminal offences. Typically, this is organized in penal and correctional services - in custody in prisons, or in the community, supervised by services such as probation. Bringing together international experts, this book is the go-to source for students, researchers, and practitioners in criminal justice, looking for a comprehensive and authoritative summary of available knowledge in the field. Covering a variety of contexts, settings, needs, and approaches, and drawing on theory and practice, this Companion brings together over 90 entries, offering readers concise and definitive overviews of a range of key contemporary issues on working with offenders. The book is split into thematic sections and includes coverage of: Theories and models for working with offenders Policy contexts of offender supervision and rehabilitation Direct work with offenders Control, surveillance, and practice Resettlement Application to specific groups, including female offenders, young offenders, families, and ethnic minorities Application to specific needs and contexts, such as substance misuse, mental health, violence, and risk assessment Practitioner and offender perspectives The development of an evidence base This book is an essential and flexible resource for researchers and practitioners alike and is an authoritative guide for students taking courses on working with offenders, criminal justice policy, probation, prisons, penology, and community corrections.

Full Product Details

Author:   Pamela Ugwudike (Department of Sociology, Social Policy and Criminology, University of Southampton, UK) ,  Hannah Graham (Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Stirling, UK) ,  Fergus McNeill (School of Social & Political Sciences, University of Glasgow, UK) ,  Peter Raynor (College of Law and Criminology, Swansea University, UK)
Publisher:   Taylor & Francis Ltd
Imprint:   Routledge
Weight:   2.581kg
ISBN:  

9781138102057


ISBN 10:   1138102059
Pages:   1188
Publication Date:   19 September 2019
Audience:   College/higher education ,  Postgraduate, Research & Scholarly ,  Undergraduate
Format:   Hardback
Publisher's Status:   Active
Availability:   In Print   Availability explained
This item will be ordered in for you from one of our suppliers. Upon receipt, we will promptly dispatch it out to you. For in store availability, please contact us.

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Reviews

Giving those who offend the opportunity, the resources and the support to become better people has always seemed the most ethical of penal aims, but in insecure and turbulent times it has invariably been the hardest to defend and sustain. Historically, not all that has been done in rehabilitation's name has been wise, kind or effective and it has long needed the sort of critical friends it finds here to ensure that in both theory and practice it is aligned with human rights and goes beyond merely meeting criminogenic needs. Never before have the philosophical, political and empirical arguments in its favour - and the numerous unresolved tensions in debate about them - been brought together as comprehensibly as they are in this welcome collection. It sets out all the models of good practice and identifies the contexts and cultures in which they are likely to thrive. It faces up squarely to the moral and practical challenges that champions of rehabilitation will always face, including the new technological ones. It makes a better world possible. Mike Nellis, Emeritus Professor of Criminal and Community Justice, University of Strathclyde, UK Providing effective rehabilitation is a critically important function of the criminal justice system. Significant advances have been made but are hard won, and require careful attention to matching interventions to needs. At the same time, reforms are often compromised by political considerations and resource constraints. This admirable collection by a range of leading scholars and practitioners provides the reader with an up-to-date map and assessment of contemporary theories and practices to help them navigate this complex area, and understand how to choose or implement effective solutions. Dr. Stuart Ross, School of Social & Political Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Australia This collection of essays brings together an impressive group of authors to push forward knowledge and thinking on processes of desistance and rehabilitation. Stephen Farrall, Research Professor in Criminology, College of Business, Law and the Social Sciences, The University of Derby, UK The history of punishing crime is intimately tied to the concept of rehabilitation--or the process and potential of reforming people who break the law into law-abiding citizens. Across time and place, academics and practitioners have debated if rehabilitation through criminal justice interventions is possible and whether it ought to be one of the core goals of punishment. The Routledge Companion to Rehabilitative Work in Criminal Justice provides a fresh international and cross-disciplinary look at these questions, considering rehabilitation and desistance from the perspective of researchers, practitioners, and people experiencing criminal justice contact. Michelle Phelps, Assistant Professor of Sociology, University of Minnesota (Twin Cities), USA


Author Information

Pamela Ugwudike is Associate Professor of Criminology at the University of Southampton, UK. She is also affiliated with the Alan Turing Institute as a Turing Fellow. Her research interests include studying advances in critical criminological theory and analysing criminal justice policy and practice. She is particularly interested in theoretical and empirical studies of interactions between digital technology and criminal justice, and the implications for social justice. Her recent publications include An Introduction to Critical Criminology (2015) and Evidence-Based Skills in Criminal Justice: International Research on Supporting Rehabilitation and Desistance (2018, co-edited with Peter Raynor and Jill Annison). Hannah Graham is Senior Lecturer in Criminology in the Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research (SCCJR) in the Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Stirling, UK. As a criminologist and social scientist, Hannah works with governments and parliaments, practitioners, citizens, communities, and civic society to help inform real-world change and collaboratively build more just societies. She has made contributions in Scottish, European, and Australasian contexts. Also, Hannah is developing a growing research agenda on innovation and justice, on which she has researched, written, and spoken in different countries. Her publications include Supporting Desistance and Recovery (2016), Innovative Justice (2015), and Working with Offenders: A Guide to Concepts and Practices (2010), all published internationally by Routledge. Fergus McNeill is Professor of Criminology and Social Work at the University of Glasgow, UK, where he works in the Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research (SCCJR). He has published extensively on institutions, cultures, and practices of punishment - and on how they might be best reformed in the light of evidence about desistance from crime. This work has led to a series of engagements with policy, practice, and people with lived experience of punishment in numerous jurisdictions. Peter Raynor is Emeritus Research Professor of Criminology at Swansea University, UK, and has been carrying out and publishing research on criminal justice and offender management for more than 40 years. Over 200 publications include jointly edited collections on offender supervision (with McNeill and Trotter), compliance (with Ugwudike), social work with offenders (with McIvor), and race and probation (with Lewis, Smith, and Wardak). He is a member of the Correctional Services Accreditation and Advisory Panel for England and Wales, and a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences. Faye S. Taxman is University Professor in the Criminology, Law and Society Department and Director of the Center for Advancing Correctional Excellence at George Mason University, USA. Her work covers the breadth of the correctional system from jails and prisons to community corrections and adult and juvenile offenders, including all types of interventions and system improvement factors. Dr Taxman has published over 125 articles. She is the author (with Steve Belenkos) of Implementing Evidence-Based Community Corrections and Addiction Treatment (2011). She is also on the Editorial Boards of the Journal of Experimental Criminology, Criminology and Public Policy, and Journal of Offender Rehabilitation. Chris Trotter is Emeritus Professor in the Department of Social Work at Monash University, Australia and Director, Monash Criminal Justice Research Consortium. Prior to his appointment to Monash he worked for many years as a social worker and manager in adult corrections, child protection, and youth justice. He has undertaken more than 30 funded research projects and has more than 100 publications, including eight books. His book Working with Involuntary Clients, now in its third edition, is published in English, Chinese, Japanese, French, and German. He has a strong international reputation, particularly for his work on pro-social modelling, and has been invited to more than 15 different countries to present conference plenary sessions and workshops for probation officers and others who work with offenders.

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