The Man Who Couldn't Die: The Tale of an Authentic Human Being

Author:   Marian Schwartz ,  Olga Slavnikova ,  Mark Lipovetsky
Publisher:   Columbia University Press
ISBN:  

9780231185950


Pages:   248
Publication Date:   29 January 2019
Format:   Paperback
Availability:   To order   Availability explained
Stock availability from the supplier is unknown. We will order it for you and ship this item to you once it is received by us.

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The Man Who Couldn't Die: The Tale of an Authentic Human Being


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Author:   Marian Schwartz ,  Olga Slavnikova ,  Mark Lipovetsky
Publisher:   Columbia University Press
Imprint:   Columbia University Press
ISBN:  

9780231185950


ISBN 10:   0231185952
Pages:   248
Publication Date:   29 January 2019
Audience:   Professional and scholarly ,  Professional & Vocational
Format:   Paperback
Publisher's Status:   Active
Availability:   To order   Availability explained
Stock availability from the supplier is unknown. We will order it for you and ship this item to you once it is received by us.
Language:   English

Table of Contents

Introduction by Mark Lipovetsky The Man Who Couldn't Die

Reviews

Darkly sardonic . . . . oddly timely, for there are all sorts of understated hints about voter fraud, graft, payoffs, and the endless promises of politicians who have no intention of keeping them. It is also deftly constructed, portraying a world and a cast of characters who are caught between the orderly if drab world of old and the chaos of the 'new rich' in a putative democracy. . . . Slavnikova is a writer American readers will want to have more of.--Kirkus Reviews The Man Who Couldn't Die is an overlooked masterpiece of post-Soviet prose by one of contemporary Russia's most important authors. It reveals how Slavnikova's descriptions (and Schwartz's English equivalent) belong alongside those of Vladimir Nabokov, Iurii Olesha, and Nikolai Gogol as truly revolutionary in Russian prose.--Benjamin Sutcliffe, Miami University


A startling phantasmagoric dystopia, award-winning author Slavnikova's original and challenging vision of Russia's tumultuous 1990s ruminates on death, temporality, memory, illusions, and the persistence of an inert past in a chaotic present. This unforgettable novel cannot help but leave the post-Bond reader both shaken and stirred.--Helena Goscilo, The Ohio State University The Man Who Couldn't Die is an overlooked masterpiece of post-Soviet prose by one of contemporary Russia's most important authors. It reveals how Slavnikova's descriptions (and Schwartz's English equivalent) belong alongside those of Vladimir Nabokov, Iurii Olesha, and Nikolai Gogol as truly revolutionary in Russian prose.--Benjamin Sutcliffe, Miami University


The Man Who Couldn't Die is an overlooked masterpiece of post-Soviet prose by one of contemporary Russia's most important authors. It reveals how Slavnikova's descriptions (and Schwartz's English equivalent) belong alongside those of Vladimir Nabokov, Iurii Olesha, and Nikolai Gogol as truly revolutionary in Russian prose.--Benjamin Sutcliffe, Miami University


Author Information

Olga Slavnikova was born in 1957 in Sverdlovsk (now Ekaterinburg). She is the author of several award-winning novels, including 2017, which won the 2006 Russian Booker prize and was translated into English by Marian Schwartz (2010), and Long Jump, which won the 2018 Yasnaya Polyana Award. Marian Schwartz translates Russian contemporary and classic fiction, including Tolstoy's Anna Karenina, and is the principal translator of Nina Berberova.

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