Late and Post-Soviet Russian Literature: A Reader, Book 2 - Thaw and Stagnation (1954 - 1986)

Author:   Mark Lipovetsky ,  Lisa Ryoko Wakamiya
Publisher:   Academic Studies Press
ISBN:  

9781618114341


Pages:   602
Publication Date:   19 November 2015
Format:   Paperback
Availability:   In stock   Availability explained
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Late and Post-Soviet Russian Literature: A Reader, Book 2 - Thaw and Stagnation (1954 - 1986)


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Overview

The second volume of Late Soviet and Post-Soviet Literature: A Reader treats the literature of the Thaw and Stagnation periods (1954-1986). It includes translations of poetry and prose as well as scholarly texts that provide additional material for discussion. The goal of this volume is to present the range of ideas, creative experiments, and formal innovations that accompanied the social and political changes of the late Soviet era. Together with the introductory essays and biographical notes, the texts collected here will engage all students and interested readers of late Soviet Russian literature.

Full Product Details

Author:   Mark Lipovetsky ,  Lisa Ryoko Wakamiya
Publisher:   Academic Studies Press
Imprint:   Academic Studies Press
Dimensions:   Width: 15.60cm , Height: 3.10cm , Length: 23.40cm
Weight:   0.333kg
ISBN:  

9781618114341


ISBN 10:   1618114344
Pages:   602
Publication Date:   19 November 2015
Audience:   College/higher education ,  Undergraduate ,  Postgraduate, Research & Scholarly
Format:   Paperback
Publisher's Status:   Active
Availability:   In stock   Availability explained
We have confirmation that this item is in stock with the supplier. It will be ordered in for you and dispatched immediately.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments 9 Part I: Literature of the Thaw Introduction 15 Nikita Khrushchev 25 From Speech to the 20th Congress of the CPSU 25 Pyotr Vail' and Alexander Genis 43 From The Sixties: The World of the Soviet Man 44 Physicists and Lyricists. Science 44 Laughter Without Cause. Humor 52 Who Is to Blame? Dissidence 57 Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn 70 Robert Porter From Solzhenitsyn's One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich 72 Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn From The Gulag Archipelago Chapter 10. Behind the Wire the Ground Is Burning 84 Chapter 12. The Forty Days of Kengir 91 Varlam Shalamov 109 On Prose 111 Eulogy 127 Vasily Grossman 144 From Forever Flowing 146 Vladimir Tendryakov 169 Bread for a Dog 170 Yulii Daniel (Nikolai Arzhak) 193 This Is Moscow Speaking 194 Andrey Sinyavsky (Abram Tertz) 234 Dissent as a Personal Experience 236 Poetry of the 1960s 254 Yevgeny Yevtushenko 255 Babii Yar 256 The Heirs of Stalin 259 The Execution of Stenka Razin (From Bratsk Hydroelectric Station) 262 Interview with Yevgeny Yevtushenko 268 Andrei Voznesensky 282 Antiworlds 283 Parabolic Ballad 285 Ballad of 1941 287 The Triangular Pear 288 Alexander Galich 291 Behind Seven Fences 292 Lenochka 294 To the Memory of Boris Leonidovich Pasternak 298 Comrades, I'll tell you like it is 301 Vassily Aksyonov 302 From A Mysterious Passion 304 Part II: Literature of the Stagnation Introduction 335 Alexei Yurchak 341 Living Vnye : Deterritorialized Milieus 341 Joseph Brodsky 359 Less Than One 361 Selected Poems 385 Letters to a Roman Friend 385 May 24, 1980 388 The Hawk's Cry in Autumn 389 Andrei Bitov 393 From Pushkin House 394 Yurii Dombrovsky 399 Little Arm, Leg, Cucumber . . . 401 Neo-Classical Poetry 421 Aleksandr Kushner 422 No, not one face, but two: the world 423 Someone's crying all night 424 We don't get to choose our century 425 As at every doorstep grow rowan and maple 426 Pan 427 Memoirs 428 Before the War: Recollections 429 Lev Losev 430 I know, the Mongol yoke, the years of famine 431 I used to work for Campfire. In that dreary place 432 At a Geneva Watchmaker's 434 Bakhtin in Saransk 435 Grammar is indeed the god of the mind 437 Amphibronchic Night 438 The house 439 A poet is compost, in him dead words 440 Near the lake, where one can easily drown 441 Cloth (doctoral dissertation) 443 Elena Shvarts 446 The Dump 447 The Invisible Hunter 448 Elegy on an X-ray Photo of my Skull 449 I was born with an unlined palm 451 Orpheus 452 Viktor Krivulin 454 From the cycle Anniversary Verses 455 Trash 455 Where Is Our New Tolstoy? 455 The Millennium Changing Shifts 456 From Metropol' 458 Vladimir Vysotsky 461 Wolf Hunt 462 Bathhouse Blues 464 Parody of a Bad Detective Story 466 Dialogue 469 Yuz Aleshkovsky 472 Lesbian Song 473 Cigarette Butt 474 Personal Meeting 476 Genrikh Sapgir 478 A Voice 479 Radioblab 481 Monkey 483 Viktor Erofeev 485 The Metropol' Affair 487 Sergei Dovlatov 502 The Performance 504 Evgeny Kharitonov 529 How I Found Out : One Boy's Story 530 Flysheet 537 Venedikt Erofeev 540 Olga Sedakova 541 Remembering Venedikt Erofeev 542 Mikhail Epshtein 560 From Charms of Entropy 561 Dmitry A. Prigov 574 Selected poems from Texts of Our Life 576 Selected poems from Written Between 1975 and 1989 581 Vladimir Shinkarev 585 From Mit'ki 586

Reviews

This anthology is an indispensable tool for those who want to understand the convoluted cultural universe of the post-war Soviet Union. Bringing together texts by such diverse authors as Nikita Krushchev and Dmitry Prigov, Vladimir Vysotsky and Yevgeny Yevtushenko (among many others), the anthology presents the last four decades of Soviet culture as a polyphony of contradictory and incompatible voices. Shaped by modernists and traditionalists, formalists and realists, this period emerges as an exciting colorful mosaic of people, ideas, and texts. --Serguei A. Oushakine, Princeton University -This anthology is an indispensable tool for those who want to understand the convoluted cultural universe of the post-war Soviet Union. Bringing together texts by such diverse authors as Nikita Krushchev and Dmitry Prigov, Vladimir Vysotsky and Yevgeny Yevtushenko (among many others), the anthology presents the last four decades of Soviet culture as a polyphony of contradictory and incompatible voices. Shaped by modernists and traditionalists, formalists and realists, this period emerges as an exciting colorful mosaic of people, ideas, and texts.---Serguei A. Oushakine, Princeton University -Both volumes provide a valuable addition to courses on late Soviet or post-Soviet literature and culture. They contain comprehensive collections of diverse materials and include texts that were not previously translated into English, in excellent translations and supplemented with footnotes, as well as previously published texts that are less familiar to American students. While both volumes have the same editors and provide new and exciting materials for courses in late Soviet and contemporary Russian culture, they differ substantially in their structure and content. Therefore, they present different advantages and challenges for being a course textbook or supplement ... Because it includes many key authors of the period, it could be used as a stand-alone course reader. Moreover, it contains a good balance of primary and secondary texts that provide additional historical and theoretical context ... Both readers present a compelling collection of materials and well-written introductory essays that might be interesting for a scholar of Russian Studies.---Irina Anisimova, Miami University of Ohio, The Russian Review no. 76 vol. 2 April 2017


This anthology is an indispensable tool for those who want to understand the convoluted cultural universe of the post-war Soviet Union. Bringing together texts by such diverse authors as Nikita Krushchev and Dmitry Prigov, Vladimir Vysotsky and Yevgeny Yevtushenko (among many others), the anthology presents the last four decades of Soviet culture as a polyphony of contradictory and incompatible voices. Shaped by modernists and traditionalists, formalists and realists, this period emerges as an exciting colorful mosaic of people, ideas, and texts. --Serguei A. Oushakine, Princeton University


Author Information

Mark Lipovetsky is professor of Russian Studies in the department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures and joint faculty member in the Comparative Literature Program at the University of Boulder. He is the author of Paralogies: The Transformations of (Post)Modern Discourse in Russian Culture of the 1920s-2000s (2008) and Charms of Cynical Reason: Tricksters in Soviet and Post-Soviet Culture (2010). Lisa Ryoko Wakamiya is associate professor in the department of Modern Languages and Linguistics at Florida State University. She is the author of Locating Exiled Writers in Contemporary Russian Literature (2009).

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