french exit
 
Our September Book of the Month
French Exit
by Patrick deWitt


Dean: I loved this book! It was quirky, strange, joyous and absurd. DeWitt's writing is lightly refreshing yet darkly comic. The characters are brilliant, ageing heroine Francis Price is a bitter-hearted joy to read. Her son Malcolm is an odd and hilarious detached fellow. The wealthy Prices are broke and they escape to Paris for Francis's final countdown. If you like offbeat books then this frivolous absurdist comedy is the wonderful something for you.
 
John: Looking for something different? DeWitt is a true original. The brilliance he displayed in previous novels The Sisters Brothers and Undermajordomo Minor is on show again in French Exit, a gleeful comedu (tragedy?) of manners that skewers the 1%. Vibrant characters with pithy and arch humour and a talent for the preposterous all add up to the best form of entertainment.
 

meet me
 
Our September Kids' Book of the Month
Meet Me at the Intersection
 Edited by Rebecca Lim & Ambelin Kwaymullina

This YA collection is a much needed celebration of Australian lives for their diversity and their unique perspectives on the world. Including short fiction, memoir and poetry from a variety of genres and written by authors who identify as Aboriginal Australians, people of colour, refugees, LGBTIQA+, or living with a disability.

Ambelin Kwaymullina's beautiful and eye-catching front cover artwork 'Voices from the Intersections' paints a hopeful picture of Australia where everyone is equal qith representations of voices from all walks of life being shared and valued. Nuanced, complex and inspiring, each story gives a voice to people and communities whose voices have been marginalised for far too long.

Mischa's favourite is 'Autumn Leaves' by Wendy Chen because Chen's lyrical prose is so perceptually evocative; effectively encapsulating the feelings of tension, insecurity and hope of being a young Chinese-Australian woman from a migrant family at the time of Federation.

Steph loved Ezekiel Kwaymullina's 'Embers' because of its power to say so much in so few words. It is a heart-wrenching depiction of what it means to be overlooked as an Aboriginal boy growing up; every time you read it, there is something more to discover hidden in its simple complexity.

Jan thought Ellen van Neerven's 'Night Feet' was a poignant portrayal of family life and a nuanced representation of an Aboriginal teenage girl who aspires to kick some serious goals (both on and off the soccer field.

 $19.99

Australian Fiction  
The Good Son
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Wintering
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Hey Brother
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The Life to Come
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Fiction  
Normal People
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Take Nothing With You
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The Day the Sun Died
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The Incendiaries
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Young Adult  
Inside the Tiger
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And the Ocean Was Our Sky
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KILLER T
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Colour Me In
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Children's Books  
Limelight
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Fairytales for Feisty Girls
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How Did I Get Here?
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Alpacas with Maracas HB
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Cooking  
Adriatico: Stories and recipes from Italy's Adriatic Coast
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Milkwood: Real skills for down-to-earth living
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The Village
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Zaitoun: Recipes and Stories from the Palestinian Kitchen
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Biography  
Rocky Road: The incredible true story of the fractured family behind the Darrell Lea chocolate empire
Add to Cart
Queerstories: Reflections on lives well lived from some of Australia's finest LGBTQIA+ writers
Add to Cart
Journeys to the Other Side of the World: further adventures of a young naturalist
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Autumn in Venice: Ernest Hemingway and His Last Muse
Add to Cart
Winter Writing Competition
its a picture

 

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