Trapped in the Net: The Unanticipated Consequences of Computerization

Awards:   Runner-up for Choice Magazine Outstanding Reference/Academic Book Award 1997 Runner-up for Choice Magazine Outstanding Reference/Academic Book Award 1997. Short-listed for Choice's Outstanding Academic Books 1997 (United States) Winner of Don K. Price Award of the Science, Technology and Environmental Politics Section of the American Political Science Association 1999 (United States)
Author:   Gene I. Rochlin
Publisher:   Princeton University Press
Edition:   New edition
ISBN:  

9780691002477


Pages:   310
Publication Date:   27 July 1998
Format:   Paperback
Availability:   Awaiting stock   Availability explained
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Trapped in the Net: The Unanticipated Consequences of Computerization


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Awards

  • Runner-up for Choice Magazine Outstanding Reference/Academic Book Award 1997
  • Runner-up for Choice Magazine Outstanding Reference/Academic Book Award 1997.
  • Short-listed for Choice's Outstanding Academic Books 1997 (United States)
  • Winner of Don K. Price Award of the Science, Technology and Environmental Politics Section of the American Political Science Association 1999 (United States)

Overview

Full Product Details

Author:   Gene I. Rochlin
Publisher:   Princeton University Press
Imprint:   Princeton University Press
Edition:   New edition
Dimensions:   Width: 15.20cm , Height: 2.00cm , Length: 22.90cm
Weight:   0.454kg
ISBN:  

9780691002477


ISBN 10:   0691002479
Pages:   310
Publication Date:   27 July 1998
Audience:   Professional and scholarly ,  College/higher education ,  Professional & Vocational ,  Tertiary & Higher Education
Format:   Paperback
Publisher's Status:   Active
Availability:   Awaiting stock   Availability explained
The supplier is currently out of stock of this item. It will be ordered for you and placed on backorder. Once it does come back in stock, we will ship it out for you.
Language:   English

Table of Contents

Reviews

Winner of the 1999 Don K. Price Award, Science, Technology and Environmental Politics Section of the American Political Science Association One of Choice's Outstanding Academic Titles for 1997 In Trapped in the Net, an insightful and painstakingly documented book, [Rochlin] explores the changes already wrought by computers and networking in areas as diverse as financial markets, air travel, nuclear power plants, corporate management and the military. --Lawrence Hunter, The New York Times Book Review Trapped in the Net covers not only the military, but also financial markets, aviation and business. In all cases, humans working inside organizations become helpless just when the systems they use encounter the unexpected and start behaving idiotically. This is a fascinating and well-argued book... The references are good, and certainly prove that Rochlin is not a lone voice with a cynical message. --Harold Thimbleby, New Scientist [Rochlin's] straightforward argument should be apparent to those managing and promoting increasing computerization: that greater dependence on computers implies greater disaster when they fail... Rochlin ends with an exploration of the new cyberized military and continues to pinpoint the unintended consequences that computer enthusiasts rarely think about, but should. -- Booklist ... computerization is leading us into pretty dire straits. In financial markets, warp-speed automated trading creates opportunities for fraud and moves us further away from a stable investment climate. In the office, computers promise efficiency, but bring fragmented knowledge and reduced autonomy to workers. There's worse news. Pilots in the 'glass cockpits' of modern airplanes have too much data to interpret, and nuclear power plant operators are less likely to have an intuitive feel for things going wrong 'on the floor'. Most sobering of all is the discussion of automation and the military. -- Publishers Weekly


In Trapped in the Net, an insightful and painstakingly documented book, [Rochlin] explores the changes already wrought by computers and networking in areas as diverse as financial markets, air travel, nuclear power plants, corporate management and the military. -- Lawrence Hunter The New York Times Book Review Trapped in the Net covers not only the military, but also financial markets, aviation and business. In all cases, humans working inside organizations become helpless just when the systems they use encounter the unexpected and start behaving idiotically. This is a fascinating and well-argued book... The references are good, and certainly prove that Rochlin is not a lone voice with a cynical message. -- Harold Thimbleby New Scientist [Rochlin's] straightforward argument should be apparent to those managing and promoting increasing computerization: that greater dependence on computers implies greater disaster when they fail... Rochlin ends with an exploration of the new cyberized military and continues to pinpoint the unintended consequences that computer enthusiasts rarely think about, but should. Booklist ... computerization is leading us into pretty dire straits. In financial markets, warp-speed automated trading creates opportunities for fraud and moves us further away from a stable investment climate. In the office, computers promise efficiency, but bring fragmented knowledge and reduced autonomy to workers. There's worse news. Pilots in the 'glass cockpits' of modern airplanes have too much data to interpret, and nuclear power plant operators are less likely to have an intuitive feel for things going wrong 'on the floor'. Most sobering of all is the discussion of automation and the military. Publishers Weekly


Winner of the 1999 Don K. Price Award, Science, Technology and Environmental Politics Section of the American Political Science Association One of Choice's Outstanding Academic Titles for 1997 In Trapped in the Net, an insightful and painstakingly documented book, [Rochlin] explores the changes already wrought by computers and networking in areas as diverse as financial markets, air travel, nuclear power plants, corporate management and the military. --Lawrence Hunter, The New York Times Book Review Trapped in the Net covers not only the military, but also financial markets, aviation and business. In all cases, humans working inside organizations become helpless just when the systems they use encounter the unexpected and start behaving idiotically. This is a fascinating and well-argued book... The references are good, and certainly prove that Rochlin is not a lone voice with a cynical message. --Harold Thimbleby, New Scientist [Rochlin's] straightforward argument should be apparent to those managing and promoting increasing computerization: that greater dependence on computers implies greater disaster when they fail... Rochlin ends with an exploration of the new cyberized military and continues to pinpoint the unintended consequences that computer enthusiasts rarely think about, but should. --Booklist ... computerization is leading us into pretty dire straits. In financial markets, warp-speed automated trading creates opportunities for fraud and moves us further away from a stable investment climate. In the office, computers promise efficiency, but bring fragmented knowledge and reduced autonomy to workers. There's worse news. Pilots in the 'glass cockpits' of modern airplanes have too much data to interpret, and nuclear power plant operators are less likely to have an intuitive feel for things going wrong 'on the floor'. Most sobering of all is the discussion of automation and the military. --Publishers Weekly


Author Information

Gene I. Rochlin is Professor of Energy and Resources at the University of California, Berkeley. He has been the recipient of a John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Individual Fellowship for Research and Writing in International Security and of a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship.

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