Onion Street

Author:   Reed Farrel Coleman
Publisher:   Adams Media Corporation
ISBN:  

9781440539459


Pages:   320
Publication Date:   18 May 2013
Format:   Hardback
Availability:   In Print   Availability explained
This item will be ordered in for you from one of our suppliers. Upon receipt, we will promptly dispatch it out to you. For in store availability, please contact us.

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Onion Street


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Full Product Details

Author:   Reed Farrel Coleman
Publisher:   Adams Media Corporation
Imprint:   Tyrus Books
Dimensions:   Width: 14.00cm , Height: 3.00cm , Length: 21.40cm
Weight:   0.508kg
ISBN:  

9781440539459


ISBN 10:   1440539456
Pages:   320
Publication Date:   18 May 2013
Audience:   General/trade ,  General
Format:   Hardback
Publisher's Status:   Active
Availability:   In Print   Availability explained
This item will be ordered in for you from one of our suppliers. Upon receipt, we will promptly dispatch it out to you. For in store availability, please contact us.

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Reviews

<p> The seventh outing (after Hurt Machine ) for PI (and former NYPD cop) Moe Prager makes an effective coming-of-age prequel, explaining how he got into police work in the first place. Coleman has won multiple awards for his gritty but soulful series, and this entry is of that same high caliber. Don't miss it. - Library Journal <p> Coleman's latest--a prequel to the award-winning Moe Prager series--is a slam-dunk recommendation for readers drawn to smart, gritty, crime fiction with label-defying characters. Coleman ... nicely balanc[es] plot and action. - Booklist, Starred review<p> Edgar-finalist Coleman's outstanding eighth Moe Prager mystery (after 2011's Hurt Machine ) explains how the NYPD detective turned PI became a cop. The 2012 funeral of an old friend prompts Prager to recount the complex history he shared with the dead man, Bobby Friedman. The twists and turns are unpredictable, but Coleman pulls everything together by the end. - Publisher's Weekly starred review<p> The story is exciting enough by itself, it's simply a good mystery story, but what makes it so great is the little pieces of foreshadowing of Prager's future.... An interesting character study as well as a piece of good historical hardboiled fiction. This one's recommended. Highly. - Sons of Spade blog<p> Moe Prager fans are in for a treat as novice crime fighter Moe attempts to solve this convoluted case, giving insight into the cop, PI, and man he eventually becomes. [Coleman]... paint[s] a setting so vividly that readers are immersed in the dreariness and despair of 1967 Brooklyn, makes for a book that's difficult to put down. - Mystery Scene Magazine <p> There's a lot to enjoy here. It's a book that many Moe fans will enjoy. It's also one that newcomers might find interesting and, in case they don't already know, there's a lot to come if they become hooked. - Sea Minor blog<p> For long-time fans of Prager and creator Reed Farrel Coleman, the novel sheds a new and welcome


<p> The seventh outing (after Hurt Machine ) for PI (and former NYPD cop) Moe Prager makes an effective coming-of-age prequel, explaining how he got into police work in the first place. Coleman has won multiple awards for his gritty but soulful series, and this entry is of that same high caliber. Don't miss it. - Library Journal <p> Coleman's latest--a prequel to the award-winning Moe Prager series--is a slam-dunk recommendation for readers drawn to smart, gritty, crime fiction with label-defying characters. Coleman ... nicely balanc[es] plot and action. - Booklist, Starred review<p> Edgar-finalist Coleman's outstanding eighth Moe Prager mystery (after 2011's Hurt Machine ) explains how the NYPD detective turned PI became a cop. The 2012 funeral of an old friend prompts Prager to recount the complex history he shared with the dead man, Bobby Friedman. The twists and turns are unpredictable, but Coleman pulls everything together by the end. - Publisher's Weekly starred review<p> Very entertaining company on the beach before the summer slips away. - Penthouse <p> The story is exciting enough by itself, it's simply a good mystery story, but what makes it so great is the little pieces of foreshadowing of Prager's future.... An interesting character study as well as a piece of good historical hardboiled fiction. This one's recommended. Highly. - Sons of Spade blog<p> Moe Prager fans are in for a treat as novice crime fighter Moe attempts to solve this convoluted case, giving insight into the cop, PI, and man he eventually becomes. [Coleman]... paint[s] a setting so vividly that readers are immersed in the dreariness and despair of 1967 Brooklyn, makes for a book that's difficult to put down. - Mystery Scene Magazine <p> There's a lot to enjoy here. It's a book that many Moe fans will enjoy. It's also one that newcomers might find interesting and, in case they don't already know, there's a lot to come if they become hooked. - Sea Minor blog<p> For long


The seventh outing (after Hurt Machine ) for PI (and former NYPD cop) Moe Prager makes an effective coming-of-age prequel, explaining how he got into police work in the first place. Coleman has won multiple awards for his gritty but soulful series, and this entry is of that same high caliber. Don't miss it. -- Library Journal Coleman's latest - a prequel to the award-winning Moe Prager series - is a slam-dunk recommendation for readers drawn to smart, gritty, crime fiction with label-defying characters. Coleman . . . nicely balanc[es] plot and action. -- Booklist, Starred Review Edgar-finalist Coleman's outstanding eighth Moe Prager mystery (after 2011's Hurt Machine ) explains how the NYPD detective turned PI became a cop. The 2012 funeral of an old friend prompts Prager to recount the complex history he shared with the dead man, Bobby Friedman. The twists and turns are unpredictable, but Coleman pulls everything together by the end. -- Publisher's Weekly Starred Review Very entertaining company on the beach before the summer slips away. -- Penthouse The story is exciting enough by itself, it's simply a good mystery story, but what makes it so great is the little pieces of foreshadowing of Prager's future . . . An interesting character study as well as a piece of good historical hardboiled fiction. This one's recommended. Highly. -- Sons of Spade blog Moe Prager fans are in for a treat as novice crime fighter Moe attempts to solve this convoluted case, giving insight into the cop, PI, and man he eventually becomes. [Coleman] . . . paint[s] a setting so vividly that readers are immersed in the dreariness and despair of 1967 Brooklyn, makes for a book that's difficult to put down. -- Mystery Scene Magazine There's a lot to enjoy here. It's a book that many Moe fans will enjoy. It's also one that newcomers might find interesting and, in case they don't already know, there's a lot to come if they become hooked. -- Sea Minor blog


<p>The seventh outing (after Hurt Machine ) for PI (and former NYPD cop) Moe Prager makes an effective coming-of-age prequel, explaining how he got into police work in the first place. Coleman has won multiple awards for his gritty but soulful series, and this entry is of that same high caliber. Don't miss it. - Library Journal <p> Coleman's latest--a prequel to the award-winning Moe Prager series--is a slam-dunk recommendation for readers drawn to smart, gritty, crime fiction with label-defying characters. Coleman ... nicely balanc[es] plot and action. - Booklist , Starred review<p> Edgar-finalist Coleman's outstanding eighth Moe Prager mystery (after 2011's Hurt Machine ) explains how the NYPD detective turned PI became a cop. The 2012 funeral of an old friend prompts Prager to recount the complex history he shared with the dead man, Bobby Friedman. The twists and turns are unpredictable, but Coleman pulls everything together by the end. - Publisher's Weekly starred review<p> The story is exciting enough by itself, it's simply a good mystery story, but what makes it so great is the little pieces of foreshadowing of Prager's future.... An interesting character study as well as a piece of good historical hardboiled fiction. This one's recommended. Highly. - Sons of Spade blog<p> Moe Prager fans are in for a treat as novice crime fighter Moe attempts to solve this convoluted case, giving insight into the cop, PI, and man he eventually becomes. [Coleman]... paint[s] a setting so vividly that readers are immersed in the dreariness and despair of 1967 Brooklyn, makes for a book that's difficult to put down. - Mystery Scene Magazine


Author Information

Reed Farrel Coleman is a New York Times bestselling author that has been called a hard-boiled poet by NPR's Maureen Corrigan and the noir poet laureate in The Huffington Post. He has published more than twenty-five previous novels, including novels in Robert Parker's Jesse Stone series, the critically acclaimed Moe Prager series, and the Gus Murphy series. A three-time winner of the Shamus Award, he has also won the Anthony, Macavity, Barry, and Audie Awards. He lives with his family on Long Island.

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