Last Stories

Author:   William Trevor
Publisher:   Penguin Books Ltd
ISBN:  

9780241337783


Pages:   224
Publication Date:   06 June 2019
Format:   Paperback
Availability:   In stock   Availability explained
We have confirmation that this item is in stock with the supplier. It will be ordered in for you and dispatched immediately.

Our Price $19.99 Quantity:  
Add to Cart

Share |

Last Stories


Add your own review!

Overview

Full Product Details

Author:   William Trevor
Publisher:   Penguin Books Ltd
Imprint:   Penguin Books Ltd
Dimensions:   Width: 12.90cm , Height: 1.40cm , Length: 19.80cm
Weight:   0.159kg
ISBN:  

9780241337783


ISBN 10:   024133778
Pages:   224
Publication Date:   06 June 2019
Audience:   General/trade ,  General
Format:   Paperback
Publisher's Status:   Active
Availability:   In stock   Availability explained
We have confirmation that this item is in stock with the supplier. It will be ordered in for you and dispatched immediately.

Table of Contents

Reviews

None but those with a complete mastery of fiction can walk this line. William Trevor was not an Irish Chekhov or even the Irish Chekhov . He was and will remain the Irish William Trevor -- Julian Barnes * Guardian * William Trevor's prose runs as clear as water yet tastes like gin * Economist * 10 stories bring a literary career that lasted more than half a century to a consummate conclusion -- Peter Kemp * Sunday Times * One of the great contemporary chroniclers of the human condition, in all its pathos, comedy and strangeness. As a writer he looked at the world with an always surprised but never scandalised eye, and his writer's heart was with those awkward and obscurely damaged souls who cannot quite manage the business of everyday life - all of us, that is -- John Banville * New Statesman * Extraordinary stories from ordinary lives * The Times * An Irish writer, an international writer, a great writer. Put bluntly, he is revered by writers -- Jhumpa Lahiri Trevor's prose style is effortless, elegant and economical, but manages to contain the most hugely difficult feelings: jealousy, guilt and yearning regret * Daily Mail * William Trevor's short fiction was the stuff of legend * Event Magazine * William Trevor, master of the short story, was at the top of his game in his final decade * Telegraph * What you might call Trevor's parting shots are as robustly vivid and potent, as wistful and emotionally rigorous, as his more youthful oeuvre * Herald * There are those rare, exceptional writers who are fortunate enough (like their readers) to burn bright and steady over many decades, expressing the same creative clarity at the end of their careers as they did at the beginning. William Trevor was one of those writers * LA Times * A posthumous collection of stories by the Irish writer reflects his formidable craft * Observer * He is, I think, sui generis, and in his 12 collections (and 13 novels, and two novellas: an exhibition of near-Updikean energy), he has created a version of the short story that almost ignores the form's hundred or so years of intricate evolution. These stories stay in the mind long after they're finished because they're so solid, so deliberately shaped and directed so surely toward their solemn, harsh conclusions -- William Boyd, reviewing Cheating at Canasta in the 'New York Times' Writers often get asked which authors they return to again and again, their comfort books if you will, the ones that make them remember why fiction matters. William Trevor, I have answered on countless occasions. His stories. Any of them -- John Boyne There is no better short story writer in the English-speaking world * Wall Street Journal * His stories are formally beautiful and, at the same time, interested in the smallness of human lives. He was, as a writer, watchful, unsentimental, alert to frailty and malice. A master craftsman -- Anne Enright The man - the work - was brilliant, elegant, surprising, reliable, precise, stark, often sad, sometimes funny, shocking and even frightening -- Roddy Doyle A beautiful writer... I would not have become a writer at all had I not discovered his work. -- Yiyun Li The strength of all his writing was an unshowy perfection of style, through which he expressed his unerring instinct for fairness. His total lack of self-importance allowed him to express what was important in the world around him. He was one of the greatest writers about justice and suffering, disguised as an ordinary person -- Bernard O'Donoghue In the first few paragraphs of a story he could set an entire scene without seeming to, working on details, small moments, odd thoughts. As in the work of Alice Munro, there often seemed to be very little happening in his fiction, but then he was capable of offering the reader a sense of an immense drama -- Colm Toibin He is one of the great short-story writers, at his best the equal of Chekhov -- John Banville Trevor is a master of both language and storytelling -- Hilary Mantel We honor him as the supreme master of his honest art * Cynthia Ozick * Trevor is a master of both language and storytelling His stories are formally beautiful and, at the same time, interested in the smallness of human lives. He was, as a writer, watchful, unsentimental, alert to frailty and malice. A master craftsman In the first few paragraphs of a story he could set an entire scene without seeming to, working on details, small moments, odd thoughts. As in the work of Alice Munro, there often seemed to be very little happening in his fiction, but then he was capable of offering the reader a sense of an immense drama We honor him as the supreme master of his honest art * Cynthia Ozick * There are those rare, exceptional writers who are fortunate enough (like their readers) to burn bright and steady over many decades, expressing the same creative clarity at the end of their careers as they did at the beginning. William Trevor was one of those writers * LA Times * One of the great contemporary chroniclers of the human condition, in all its pathos, comedy and strangeness. As a writer he looked at the world with an always surprised but never scandalised eye, and his writer's heart was with those awkward and obscurely damaged souls who cannot quite manage the business of everyday life - all of us, that is * New Statesman * Extraordinary stories from ordinary lives * The Times * William Trevor's prose runs as clear as water yet tastes like gin * Economist * 10 stories bring a literary career that lasted more than half a century to a consummate conclusion * Sunday Times * None but those with a complete mastery of fiction can walk this line. William Trevor was not an Irish Chekhov or even the Irish Chekhov . He was and will remain the Irish William Trevor * Guardian *


William Trevor, master of the short story, was at the top of his game in his final decade * Telegraph * What you might call Trevor's parting shots are as robustly vivid and potent, as wistful and emotionally rigorous, as his more youthful oeuvre * Herald * A posthumous collection of stories by the Irish writer reflects his formidable craft * Observer * Trevor's prose style is effortless, elegant and economical, but manages to contain the most hugely difficult feelings: jealousy, guilt and yearning regret * Daily Mail * William Trevor's short fiction was the stuff of legend * Event Magazine * There is no better short story writer in the English-speaking world * Wall Street Journal * His stories are formally beautiful and, at the same time, interested in the smallness of human lives. He was, as a writer, watchful, unsentimental, alert to frailty and malice. A master craftsman -- Anne Enright He is, I think, sui generis, and in his 12 collections (and 13 novels, and two novellas: an exhibition of near-Updikean energy), he has created a version of the short story that almost ignores the form's hundred or so years of intricate evolution. These stories stay in the mind long after they're finished because they're so solid, so deliberately shaped and directed so surely toward their solemn, harsh conclusions -- William Boyd, reviewing Cheating at Canasta in the 'New York Times' Writers often get asked which authors they return to again and again, their comfort books if you will, the ones that make them remember why fiction matters. William Trevor, I have answered on countless occasions. His stories. Any of them -- John Boyne The strength of all his writing was an unshowy perfection of style, through which he expressed his unerring instinct for fairness. His total lack of self-importance allowed him to express what was important in the world around him. He was one of the greatest writers about justice and suffering, disguised as an ordinary person -- Bernard O'Donoghue In the first few paragraphs of a story he could set an entire scene without seeming to, working on details, small moments, odd thoughts. As in the work of Alice Munro, there often seemed to be very little happening in his fiction, but then he was capable of offering the reader a sense of an immense drama -- Colm Toibin An Irish writer, an international writer, a great writer. Put bluntly, he is revered by writers -- Jhumpa Lahiri The man - the work - was brilliant, elegant, surprising, reliable, precise, stark, often sad, sometimes funny, shocking and even frightening -- Roddy Doyle A beautiful writer... I would not have become a writer at all had I not discovered his work. -- Yiyun Li He is one of the great short-story writers, at his best the equal of Chekhov -- John Banville Trevor is a master of both language and storytelling -- Hilary Mantel We honor him as the supreme master of his honest art * Cynthia Ozick * There are those rare, exceptional writers who are fortunate enough (like their readers) to burn bright and steady over many decades, expressing the same creative clarity at the end of their careers as they did at the beginning. William Trevor was one of those writers * LA Times * One of the great contemporary chroniclers of the human condition, in all its pathos, comedy and strangeness. As a writer he looked at the world with an always surprised but never scandalised eye, and his writer's heart was with those awkward and obscurely damaged souls who cannot quite manage the business of everyday life - all of us, that is -- John Banville * New Statesman * Extraordinary stories from ordinary lives * The Times * William Trevor's prose runs as clear as water yet tastes like gin * Economist * 10 stories bring a literary career that lasted more than half a century to a consummate conclusion -- Peter Kemp * Sunday Times * None but those with a complete mastery of fiction can walk this line. William Trevor was not an Irish Chekhov or even the Irish Chekhov . He was and will remain the Irish William Trevor -- Julian Barnes * Guardian *


Author Information

William Trevor was born in Mitchelstown, County Cork, Ireland in 1928. He is the author of fourteen much-lauded novels- he won the Whitbread Prize three times and was short-listed for the Booker Prize four times, most recently with The Story of Lucy Gault in 2002. Trevor was widely recognized to be one of the greatest short-story writers in the English language. In 1999, William Trevor received the prestigious David Cohen Literature Prize in recognition of a lifetime's literary achievement, and in 2002 he was awarded an honorary knighthood for his services to literature. He died in 2016.

Tab Content 6

Author Website:  

Customer Reviews

Recent Reviews

No review item found!

Add your own review!

Countries Available

All regions
Mother's Day Reading Guide

 

Flowers in a vase on top of a stack of books on a catalogue cover

Shopping Cart
Your cart is empty
Shopping cart
Mailing List