Building Brains: An Introduction to Neural Development

Author:   David J. Price ,  Andrew P. Jarman ,  John O. Mason ,  Peter C. Kind
Publisher:   John Wiley & Sons Inc
ISBN:  

9780470712306


Pages:   348
Publication Date:   18 April 2011
Format:   Hardback
Availability:   To order   Availability explained
Stock availability from the supplier is unknown. We will order it for you and ship this item to you once it is received by us.

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Building Brains: An Introduction to Neural Development


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Full Product Details

Author:   David J. Price ,  Andrew P. Jarman ,  John O. Mason ,  Peter C. Kind
Publisher:   John Wiley & Sons Inc
Imprint:   John Wiley & Sons Inc
Dimensions:   Width: 20.60cm , Height: 2.30cm , Length: 26.70cm
Weight:   1.134kg
ISBN:  

9780470712306


ISBN 10:   0470712309
Pages:   348
Publication Date:   18 April 2011
Audience:   Professional and scholarly ,  Professional & Vocational
Format:   Hardback
Publisher's Status:   Active
Availability:   To order   Availability explained
Stock availability from the supplier is unknown. We will order it for you and ship this item to you once it is received by us.

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Reviews

For undergraduates, for more advanced students studying medicine or any subject requiring an understanding of the nervous system, and for students entering such a field without prior knowledge of neuroscience - here's an accessible, yet rigorous, abundantly illustrated text offering a multifaceted approach. (Book News, 1 August 2011)<p>


Another way the authors have made this text accessible is with the layout and organisation. . .If were to come into the field again, Building Brains would be well worth a read. I think the authors have met the challenge of making neural development accessible, whilst keeping it enjoyable too. (BNA Bulletin, 2011)<p> The main strength of Building Brains already becomes evident at this point: it is a highly visual book, and the graphics are very well thought through. In the introduction, each of the model animals is represented by a small black icon that re-occurs throughout the book whenever experimental evidence from that animal is presented. . . All in all, the book 'does exactly what it says on the tin', providing an introduction to the subject, and an inspiring one at that. (J Physiol, 2011)<p> For undergraduates, for more advanced students studying medicine or any subject requiring an understanding of the nervous system, and for students entering such a field without prior knowl


For undergraduates, for more advanced students studying medicine or any subject requiring an understanding of the nervous system, and for students entering such a field without prior knowledge of neuroscience - here's an accessible, yet rigorous, abundantly illustrated text offering a multifaceted approach. (Book News, 1 August 2011)<p> With an extensive use of clear and colorful illustrations, this book makes accessible to undergraduates the beauty and complexity of neural development. The book fills a void in undergraduate neuroscience curricula, which would not be complete without an introduction to the important topic of nervous system development. <br>-- Mark F. Bear, Ph.D . Picower Professor of Neuroscience, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute<p> The book 'does exactly what it says on the tin', providing an introduction to the subject, and an inspiring one at that. <br>--J Physiol 589 (17), 2011


Another way the authors have made this text accessible is with the layout and organisation...If were to come into the field again, Building Brains would be well worth a read. I think the authors have met the challenge of making neural development accessible, whilst keeping it enjoyable too. (BNA Bulletin, 2011) The main strength of Building Brains already becomes evident at this point: it is a highly visual book, and the graphics are very well thought through. In the introduction, each of the model animals is represented by a small black icon that re-occurs throughout the book whenever experimental evidence from that animal is presented... All in all, the book &lsquo;does exactly what it says on the tin', providing an introduction to the subject, and an inspiring one at that. (J Physiol, 2011) For undergraduates, for more advanced students studying medicine or any subject requiring an understanding of the nervous system, and for students entering such a field without prior knowledge of neuroscience - here's an accessible, yet rigorous, abundantly illustrated text offering a multifaceted approach. (Book News, 1 August 2011) With an extensive use of clear and colorful illustrations, this book makes accessible to undergraduates the beauty and complexity of neural development. The book fills a void in undergraduate neuroscience curricula, which would not be complete without an introduction to the important topic of nervous system development. --Mark F. Bear, Ph.D. Picower Professor of Neuroscience, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute &ldquo;The book &lsquo;does exactly what it says on the tin', providing an introduction to the subject, and an inspiring one at that. --J Physiol 589 (17), 2011


This book is both well written and illustrated ... For clinicians, this book would be of interest to those who treat patients with disorders of Neural Development. In particular pediatric neurologists, developmental paediatricians and geneticists would appreciate this book. (Canadian Journal of Neurological Sciences, 1 January 2012) Overall, a student-friendly guide for those new to the field of neural development. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and graduate students. (Choice, 1 December 2011) Building Brains, on the other hand, is a good start to understanding what goes on during the complex process that takes us from a tiny, simple cell to the complexities of the brain. (Lab Times, 1 July 2011) Another way the authors have made this text accessible is with the layout and organisation...If were to come into the field again, Building Brains would be well worth a read. I think the authors have met the challenge of making neural development accessible, whilst keeping it enjoyable too. (BNA Bulletin, 2011) The main strength of Building Brains already becomes evident at this point: it is a highly visual book, and the graphics are very well thought through. In the introduction, each of the model animals is represented by a small black icon that re-occurs throughout the book whenever experimental evidence from that animal is presented... All in all, the book 'does exactly what it says on the tin', providing an introduction to the subject, and an inspiring one at that. (J Physiol, 2011) For undergraduates, for more advanced students studying medicine or any subject requiring an understanding of the nervous system, and for students entering such a field without prior knowledge of neuroscience - here's an accessible, yet rigorous, abundantly illustrated text offering a multifaceted approach. (Book News, 1 August 2011) With an extensive use of clear and colorful illustrations, this book makes accessible to undergraduates the beauty and complexity of neural development. The book fills a void in undergraduate neuroscience curricula, which would not be complete without an introduction to the important topic of nervous system development. -- Mark F. Bear, Ph.D . Picower Professor of Neuroscience, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute The book 'does exactly what it says on the tin', providing an introduction to the subject, and an inspiring one at that. (J Physiol, 2011) Having taught developmentalneurobiology to final yearundergraduates for the past six yearsthe arrival of this book is an absoluteblessing as it lends itself seamlessly toteaching. (BSDB Newsletter, 2011)


Author Information

David Price is Professor of Developmental Neurobiology, University of Edinburgh. Andrew Jarman is Professor of Developmental Biology, Centre for Integrative Physiology, University of Edinburgh. John Mason is Reader, Centre for Integrative Physiology, University of Edinburgh. Peter Kind is Reader, University of Edinburgh.

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