The London Corresponding Society, 1792-1799

Author:   Dr. Michael T. Davis ,  James Epstein ,  Jack Fruchtman, Jr. ,  Mary Thale
Publisher:   Taylor & Francis Ltd
ISBN:  

9781851967346


Pages:   2328
Publication Date:   25 June 2002
Format:   Hardback
Availability:   In Print   Availability explained
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The London Corresponding Society, 1792-1799


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Author:   Dr. Michael T. Davis ,  James Epstein ,  Jack Fruchtman, Jr. ,  Mary Thale
Publisher:   Taylor & Francis Ltd
Imprint:   Pickering & Chatto (Publishers) Ltd
Weight:   4.558kg
ISBN:  

9781851967346


ISBN 10:   1851967346
Pages:   2328
Publication Date:   25 June 2002
Audience:   College/higher education ,  Postgraduate, Research & Scholarly
Format:   Hardback
Publisher's Status:   Active
Availability:   In Print   Availability explained
This item will be ordered in for you from one of our suppliers. Upon receipt, we will promptly dispatch it out to you. For in store availability, please contact us.

Table of Contents

Volume 1: LCS Pamphlets (1792-95) Address from the London Corresponding Society to the inhabitants of Great Britain, on the subject of a parliamentary reform (1792); Address of the London Corresponding Society to the other societies of Great Britain, united for obtaining a reform in Parliament (1792); Letter to the Right Hon. Henry Dundas, Secretary of State for the Home Department. By the London Corresponding Society, united for the purpose of obtaining a reform in Parliament (1792); The London Corresponding Society's address and regulations (1792); The London Corresponding Society's addresses and resolutions, reprinted (1792); The London Corresponding Society having been calumniated in common with other persons desirous of obtaining a parliamentary reform ... have thought proper to address the Secretary of State, in the following letter (1792); The London Corresponding Society to the nation at large (1792); Address to the nation, from the London Corresponding Society, on the subject of a thorough parliamentary reform ... held on Monday, the 8th of July, 1793 (1793); A letter of thanks addressed by the London Corresponding Society, to Phillip Francis, Esq. MP for his able speech in Parliament, on the 10th of April, 1793. Upon the Stockbridge election bill; together with his answer (1793); Extracted from the Morning Chronicle, June 1st, 1793, the speech of John Wharton, Esq. MP in the House of Commons, on his motion on the Constitution; printed by order of the London Corresponding Society and distributed gratis (1793); Address of the London Corresponding Society, united for the purpose of obtaining universal suffrage and annual Parliaments, to the various patriotic societies of Great Britain (1794); Address of the London Corresponding Society. The address published by the London Corresponding Society, at the general meeting, held at the Globe Tavern, Strand, on Monday the 20th January, 1794 ... to the people of Great Britain and Ireland. To which are added, the King's speech at the opening of the present session of His Parliament (1794); A letter of thanks from the London Corresponding Society, to the Right Honourable Thomas Skinner, Lord Mayor of London. For his Lordship's upright conduct in dispensing with military attendance on a late occasion (1794); An account of the seizure of citizen Thomas Hardy, secretary to the London Corresponding Society; with some remarks on the suspension of the Habeas Corpus Act (1794); At a general meeting of the London Corresponding Society ... on Monday the 14th of April, 1794 ... the following letters were read (1794); London Corresponding Society. Nov. 19th 1794. The Committee gratefully acknowledge the contributions (1794); London Corresponding Society. Report of the sub-committee of Westminster; appointed April 12, 1780, to take into consideration all such matters, relative to the election of members of Parliament ... And the speech of Mr. Pitt on this subject; with the reply of Lord North, also the petition of the London Corresponding Society (1793); Reformers no rioters. Printed by order of the London Corresponding Society (1794); The London Corresponding Society's addresses and resolutions (reprinted and distributed gratis) July 1794 (1794); The report of the Committee of Constitution of the London Corresponding Society (1794); The report of the committee, appointed to revise and abridge a former report of the constitution of the London Corresponding Society (1794); The speech of Earl Stanhope, in the House of Peers, on February the 19th, 1794. With the resolutions of the London Corresponding Society thereon (1794); Account of the proceedings of a meeting of the people, in a field near Copenhagen-House, Thursday, Nov 12; including the substance of the speeches of citizens Duane, Thelwall, Jones, &c. With the petitions to the King, Lords, and Commons ... on the subject of ... a convention bill (1795); A letter, &c. to the members of the London Corresponding Society (1795); Narrative of the proceedings at a general meeting of the London Corresponding Society. Second Edition, revised and corrected ... A general meeting of the London Corresponding Society having been proposed and approved ... accordingly, on Monday the 29th of June, 1795, the society met in an inclosed field (1795). Volume 2: LCS Pamphlets (1795-8), Broadsheets (1792-7) and Treasurer's Accounts (1796-8) Pamphlets: Proceedings of a general meeting of the London Corresponding Society, held on Monday, October the 26th, 1795 (1795); The correspondence of the London Corresponding Society revised and corrected, with explanatory notes and a prefatory letter by the Committee of Arrangement ... published for the use of members (1795); The state of the representation of England and Wales, delivered to the Society, the Friends of the People, associated for the purpose of obtaining a Parliamentary reform, on Saturday the 9th of February 1793, by their committee appointed for that purpose. Revised, compressed, and reprinted by the London Corresponding Societiy [sic], 4th May 1795 (1795); To the Parliament and people of Great Britain, an explicit declaration of the principles and views of the London Corresponding Society (1795); Citizens; we are eager to address you on the extraordinary occurrences that have recently agitated the Nation (1796); Debtor The London Corresponding Society. Creditor (1796); A narrative of the proceedings at the general meeting of the London Corresponding Society, held on Monday, July 31, 1797, in a field near the veterinary college, St. Pancras, in the county of Middlesex. Citizen Thomas Stuckey, President. (1797); Citizens, we lay before you an abstract of the pecuniary transactions of the London Corresponding Society, from the 7th of July to 31st of December last (1797); The London Corresponding Society, in order to gratify the desire the public must naturally feel to know what are the particular accusations preferred against citizens Jones and Binns ... present them with copies of the indictments (1797); Thoughts on Mr. Grey's plan of reform (1797); Address of the London Corresponding Society to the British nation (1798); Proceedings of the general committee of the London Corresponding Society, on the 5th, 12th, and 19th of April, 1798, relative to the resistance of a French invasion (1798); Broadsheets: Address of the London Corresponding Society, to the other societies of Great Britain, united for the obtaining a reform in Parliament (1792); London Corresponding Society, held at the Bell, Exeter-street, Strand (1792); The following petition was presented to the House of Commons, by Philip Francis, Esq. May 6, 1793, from the London Corresponding Society. Ordered to lie on the table. The petition of the sundry inhabitants of the cities of London, Westminster, and their vicinity, to the Honourable the Commons of Great Britain, in Parliament assembled (1793); The London Corresponding Society addresses the friends of peace and parliamentary reform (1793); London Corresponding Society, Sir, it would be with considerrble [sic] embarrassment, that we address you (1793); Reform in Parliament London Corresponding Society, April 11, 1793. A petition to be presented to the Honourable the House of Commons, praying for a radical reform in the representation of the people; now lies for the reception of signatures (1793); The Berry-bush ... sung on Monday July the 8th, 1793 at the Crown and Anchor Tavern, Strand. At the first general meeting of the London Corresponding Society (1793); To the London Corresponding Society, associated for effecting a free and equal representatio[n] of the people in Parliament (1793); Citizens! The critical moment is arrived (1794); London Corresponding Society, anniversary dinner, and general meeting, Globe Tavern, Strand, Monday 20th Jan, 1794 (1794); London Corresponding Society, Feb. 3, 1794. This Society having long supported with cheerfulness and ardour (1794); London Corresponding Society. General Committee, 5th June, 1794 (1794); London Corresponding Society. July 25, 1794. To a humane and generous public no apology will be necessary (1794); Articles for future regulations of the London Corresponding Society, recommended by the executive committee (1795); London Corresponding Society. At a general meeting of this society, held on Thursday, the 12th instant (1795); London Corresponding Society. General Meeting June 29, 1795 (1795); To the British Nation. The reply of the London Corresponding Society, to the calumnies propagated by persons in high authority, for the purpose of furnishing pretences for the pending Convention Bill (1795); To the inhabitants of London and its environs. Awake! Arise! Or be for ever fall'n! ... Rally round the standard of the London Corresponding Society (1795); To the members of the Corresponding Society. Committee Room, December 31, 1795. Citizens, after the resolutions of various divisions ... it appears to us inexplicable that a few individuals should attempt to dissuade particular divisions from meeting (1795); To the Parliament and people of Great Britain. An explicit declaration of the principles and views of the London Corresponding Society (1795); Citizens, John Binns and John Gale Jones, the citizens we deputed to visit the popular society at Birmingham, are speedily to take their trial on a charge of seditious conduct (1796); Address of the London Corresponding Society to the country (1797); Answer of the London Corresponding Society, respecting a general meeting to the friends of reform in Sheffield (1797); Circular letter to the united corresponding societies of Great Britain. London Corresponding Society, sitting of the Executive Committee, July 17, 1797 (1797); Fellow-citizen, your non-attendance at your division (together with other defaulters) has been such serious disadvantage to the interests of our Society (1797); London Corresponding Society. Notice is hereby given, that a general meeting of this Society, and other friends of parliamentary reform in London ... will be held on Monday, the 31st instant (1797); London Corresponding Society. This committee having read an advertisement inserted in the public newspapers (1797); The London Corresponding Society's answer to a member of Parliament's letter (1797); London executive committee, sitting of Thursday, March 23, 1797. Fellow citizens, for a long time, a despotic administration (1797); Special sitting of the Executive Committee, June 29, 1797 (1797); To the united corresponding Societies of Britain (1797); Treasurer's Accounts: Treasurer's accounts for July 1796 (1796); Treasurer's accounts for August 1796 (1796); Treasurer's accounts for September 1796 (1796); Treasurer's accounts for October 1796 (1796); Treasurer's accounts for November 1796 (1796); Treasurer's accounts for December 1796 (1796); Treasurer's accounts for January 1797 (1797); Treasurer's accounts for February 1797 (1797); Treasurer's accounts for March 1797 (1797); Treasurer's accounts for April 1797 (1797); Treasurer's accounts for May 1797 (1797); Treasurer's accounts for June 1797 (1797); Treasurer's accounts for July 1797 (1797); Treasurer's accounts for August 1797 (1797); Treasurer's accounts for September 1797 (1797); Treasurer's accounts for October 1797 (1797); Treasurer's accounts for November 1797 (1797); Treasurer's accounts for December 1797 (1797); Treasurer's accounts for January 1798 (1798). Volume 3: LCS Periodicals (1794-6) This day is published, by the London Corresponding Society, to be continued in weekly numbers, (price one penny each) The Politician. Communications, post-paid, directed for the editor, Mr. William Townly, will be received by J. Smith, bookseller ... and by J. Burke (1794); The Politician, nos. 1-4 (1794-5); Prospectus for The Moral and Political Magazine of the London Corresponding Society (1796); The Moral and Political Magazine of the London Corresponding Society, volume 1 (1796). Volume 4: LCS Periodicals (1797) The Moral and Political Magazine of the London Corresponding Society, volume 2 (1797). Volume 5: Pamphlets Relating to the LCS [Youth, pseud.], An address to the London Corresponding Society, held at the Crown and Anchor Tavern, Strand, Monday, July 8, 1793; being an answer to a pamphlet entitled An address to the nation, on the subject of a thorough parliamentary reform (1793); [Anonymous], An address to the inhabitants of Great Britain and Ireland, in reply to a printed report of the London Corresponding Societies (1794); [James Parkinson], A vindication of the London Corresponding Society (1794); [Anonymous], A congratulatory epistle to the London Corresponding Society, on their late general meeting, in St. George's Fields. By a friend to liberty (1795); [Anonymous], Remarks upon the principles and views of the London Corresponding Society (1795); Edward Henry Iliff, A summary of the duties of citizenship! Written expressly for the members of the London Corresponding Society; including observations on the contemptuous neglect of the Secretary of State, with regard to their late address to the king! (1795); [Anonymous], The decline and fall, death, dissection and funeral procession of his most contemptible lowness the London Corresponding Society; who took his departure from this world on the 18th day of December 1795 ... By the author of The funeral of Mrs. Regency (1796); John Binns, Letters to the London Corresponding Society. One by John Binns the other by John Gale Jones (Birmingham, 1796); [Anonymous], Reply of the friends of liberty of Sheffield, summoned to take into consideration the answer of the London Corresponding Society, respecting a general meeting (Sheffield, 1797); [Hampden, pseud.], Ministers the cause of the miseries and disaffection of the people; addressed to the British nation. By Hampden. These thoughts occurred to the author on reading the reply of the people of Sheffield to the London Corresponding Society (1797); [Nottingham Corresponding Society], The proceedings at a general meeting of the Nottingham Corresponding Society, held in the market place, on the 31st of July, 1797, in pursuance of a requisition from the London Corresponding Society, requesting All the affiliated bodies to meet on the same day . Intended as an appendix to the London Society's narrative, &c. (1797). Volume 6: Parliamentary Reports and Debates (1794-99) First report of the Committee of Secrecy of the House of Commons respecting seditious practices (1794); First report from ... the House of Lords respecting seditious practices (1794); Second report ... of the House of Commons respecting seditious practices (1794); Second report of the House of Lords respecting seditious practices (1794); Debate in the Lords on the report of the Secret Committee on sedition (1794); Debates on the Treasonable Practices and Seditious Meetings Bills (1795); Report from the Committee of Secrecy ... House of Commons relative to persons and societies in Great Britain ad Ireland in a treasonable conspiracy (1799); Debate in the Commons on the report from the Committee of Secrecy relative to the proceedings of different persons and societies in Great Britain and Ireland engaged in a treasonable conspiracy (1799); Report of the Lords Committee of Secrecy relating to a treasonable conspiracy (1799).

Reviews

'A landmark in the publication of political radicalisms in Britain. It gives an incisive sense of the extraordinarily diverse range of texts, activities, repressive legislation and intellectual engagement that the LCS generated.' Journal of Historical Geography 'immensely useful' London Review of Books 'offers un-annotated photo-reproductions of London Corresponding Society works accompanied by useful but short introductions.' Albion


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